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How to Treat Protein Deficiency

How to Treat Protein Deficiency

This article helps to understand how to spot the signs when it comes to being protein deficient, along with ways on how to treat the same.
HealthHearty Staff
Last Updated: Mar 19, 2018
All of us, whether we are aware of it or not, experience some ailing trouble or another. Most of us are confident that we are fit and healthy, with no recent tests done to prove that we are. It is necessary to know that those who do not get all the dietary needs fulfilled are bound to experience some problems in the long run. Being protein deficient means that one's body lacks its main component that is responsible for carrying out the major functions in the body.
Protein is a vital element of the body cells and without it, the repercussions of not eating right can be quite harmful to the system. It also deals with growth and repair of cells needed throughout one's growing years, and even during pregnancy. There are amino acids that are essential for the body that only protein structures contain in all 9 parts. To get the most of this element, one would have to eat foods rich in protein like meat and those veggies and fruits that contain the same.
For vegetarians and vegans, there are ample vegetable and fruit sources that supply one with the important proteins that their system needs. It is imperative to give the body all the much-needed nutrients, since without one of the many components involved in its functioning, the system would take the blow because of one's negligence.
Symptoms
The signs of this condition are apparent when certain changes take place in the body that are evident and witnessed over a period of time. If one observes these changes in his/her body, then medical consultation is required immediately.
  • Deep line formations that appear on toe nails and fingers.
  • Muscles feel sore, tend to cramp, and are weak.
  • Water retention
  • Rashes that appear on the skin with hints of flakiness and dryness.
  • Difficulty in falling asleep at night.
  • Hair starts to feel brittle, with signs of hair fall.
  • Feeling lethargic
  • Frequent headaches
  • Weight loss
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea
  • Wounds take time to heal, be it scars or bruises.
  • Color tone of one's skin tends to alter.
  • Depression
  • Skin ulcers
  • Feeling moody
  • Bedsores
  • Blacking out
Treatment
There are three major problem solvers that one can consider - protein supplements, supply of protein-rich foods to get the diet back on track, or supplying fluid protein intravenously. Each method is introduced depending on the severity of the problem. The best way to tackle this problem would be to make changes in the diet and introduce foods rich in this element that should help restore protein levels over the course of a couple of weeks. It is important to always supply the body with not too much but adequate amounts of protein foods, in order to help sustain its level in the body.
High-Protein Sources for Non-Vegetarians and Vegetarians
Non-Vegetarian Protein Sources Vegetarian Protein Sources
  • Beef fillet steak
  • Lobster
  • Chicken (skinless)
  • Rabbit
  • Veal fillet (roast)
  • Goose (roast)
  • Anchovies
  • Haddock fish
  • Liver
  • Crab
  • Pork chops
  • Monk fish
  • Lamb
  • Bacon
  • Turkey (skinless)
  • Steak and kidney pie
  • Tuna
  • Eggs
  • Sushi
  • Sardines
  • Prawns / shrimp
  • Tilapia fish
  • Pork sausages
  • Venison
  • Salmon
  • Cheese
  • Couscous
  • Green peas
  • Coconut
  • Oranges
  • Milk
  • Seeds
  • Yogurt
  • Peanut butter (with peanut chunks)
  • Soya beans
  • Tofu
  • Chickpeas
  • Bread
  • Goji berries
  • Avocados
  • Hummus
  • Nuts
  • Carrots
  • Asparagus
  • Oats
  • Brown rice
  • Bananas
  • Pasta
  • Grains
  • Whey protein

On observation of the aforementioned symptoms, one should seek medical help and get a doctor's advice, and then follow what is needed to help the system get back to its normal state.
Disclaimer: This HealthHearty article is for informative purposes only, and should not be used as a replacement for expert medical advice.