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Pyogenic Granuloma of the Eyelid

Pyogenic Granuloma of the Eyelid

Pyogenic granuloma of the eyelid is basically a vascular lesion that may develop on the eyelid after an injury. In this article, we will find out more on what causes such vascular lesions on the eyelid and how can these be treated.
Smita Pandit
Chalazion, stye, xanthelasma, papilloma, hidrocystoma, sebaceous cyst and pyogenic granuloma are some of the types of bumps that may develop on an eyelid. Some of these are benign, while some may be malignant. A pyogenic granuloma, also referred to as lobular capillary hemangioma, is one such vascular lesion, that could develop on mucous membranes or the skin. These lesions may appear on the face, arms or hands. Oral pyogenic granuloma, as the name suggests, refers to the vascular wounds that occur on the mucous membrane of the oral cavity. These are quite common in pregnant women, and are sometimes, called pregnancy tumors. At times, such red bumps may appear on the palpebral conjunctiva, which is the conjunctiva at the back of the eyelid. Given below is some information on the circumstances under which one may develop such an overgrowth of tissue on the eyelid, and the methods by which these can be treated.
Causes and Symptoms of Pyogenic Granuloma on Eyelid
The term granuloma refers to a tumor or a collection of immune cells that may form as an immune response to an infection. This nodular collection resembles epithelial cells and usually develops at the site of injury or infection. The bumps on the mucous membranes or the skin, that are referred to as pyogenic granuloma, however, are not really pyogenic in nature, and also are not really granuloma in a true sense. The term is therefore, somewhat misleading. These red bumps are actually made of growths of skin that appear red due to the high number of blood vessels in affected area. It would rather, be apt to call them capillary hemangioma, which is a benign mass or proliferation of new blood vessels that develop in response to trauma. The reddish-pink color of these vascular bumps on the eyelid, is attributed to the rich blood supply from the conjunctiva.
The growth of blood vessels, which is a characteristic sign of pyogenic granuloma, is medically referred to as neoplastic vascular proliferation. The proliferation of the blood vessels is more often than not, associated with an injury. Usually these vascular lesions may appear within a week of an injury. At times, these could develop around a chalazion. There could be other factors that may make one susceptible to this condition. Women may develop such vascular lesions during the course of pregnancy. Women who use oral contraceptive pills are also at an increased risk of developing these bumps. Those who are undergoing chemotherapy are also at an increased risk of developing such vascular lesions. Development of such bumps may be associated with the use of oral retinoid drugs or protease inhibitors.
Treatment of Pyogenic Granuloma on Eyelid
Wondering how can pyogenic granuloma on the eyelid be treated. First of all, a sample of the contents of the overgrowth would be taken in order to ascertain whether the growth is benign or not. The sample is taken after administering local anesthesia to the patient. An examination of the sample can help the doctors rule out a type of skin cancer called amelonatic melanoma. The sample is taken by injecting the affected area with a local anesthesia. Once the biopsy has been performed, and the doctors feel that the growth that is formed at an injury site is nothing, but an excess tissue that resembles granulation tissue, they may prescribe certain medicated eye drops, steroids, or lubricants so as to treat the irritation.
While small lesions may resolve with the help of drugs, surgery may be recommended for the removal of a larger growth. First of all, anesthesia is administered to numb the area, after which the vascular growth is scraped off. Curettage is then followed by the process of cauterization. Surgeons may apply a needle heated by an electric current to destroy the tissue. Silver nitrate could also be used for the purpose of cauterization. The surgical procedure is quite effective, and lowers the risk of bleeding, but these lesions could also recur. Pyogenic granuloma on the eyelid may occur if a chalazion ruptures. A chalazion is basically a lesion that develops on an eyelid due to the inflammation of a hair follicle or a sebaceous gland on the eyelid. Thus, the best way to prevent such a vascular bump, would be to get chalazion or an eye stye treated at the earliest.
This was a brief overview on pyogenic granuloma on the eyelid. Though a small benign vascular lesion may resolve with the help of drug therapy, a large growth on the eyelid would certainly affect your ability to see, which is why, these vascular lesions must be treated at the earliest. If you ever spot a red bump around your eyelid, consult an ophthalmologist immediately.